Getting students talking more about what they are reading

I struggle to get all of my classes engaged in discussions that are centered around the novels that we read in class. Some classes are more chatty than others. Within those classes, the same group of kids regularly provide responses to the questions that I ask while we read. Talking about what we read is powerful. It helps us gain a deeper comprehension of the text while also providing us with other perspectives concerning the issues within the book. I need to get all of my students talking about what they read as they read so that they become better readers, even the shy ones.  Plus, it makes reading a lot more fun when it’s a shared experience!

I found this gem on Pinterest this week:

partner read questions

I put it up on the overhead and modeled for students how to use the prompts after we finished a page during our read aloud.  After I read another page, multiple hands shot up.  By the time we completed our third page, more than half of my students had a comment using one of the prompts listed on the chart.  And this was in my 1st period reading class, which is comprised of students who need additional reading support because they are still comprehending below grade level.  I was blown away by how much the level of engagement in our class discussion increased simply by giving the kids these prompts to begin their responses with.

When class ended, I immediately made twenty-something copies of the handout and had the media center specialist laminate them.  This is the teacher equivalent to changing a relationship status on Facebook, except in this case it’s taking something paper and giving it a protective plastic coating that will prolong its lifespan.  Let’s examine the parts of this tool and focus on why it’s so perfect for students when reading:

  • I’m thinking“, “I’m noticing“, “I’m wondering” and “I can’t believe” all give students the chance to quickly reflect on what they have just read.
  • This part reminds me of” allows students to connect what they are reading to something from their own lives or the real world.  These types of connections are essential in helping students better understand a text because it improves their ability to make inferences about what the characters are saying and doing simply by having that related background knowledge.
  • This is confusing because” and “Why” might be my favorites because they encourage students to think critically about what they have just read.  They may question a character’s motives or an author’s decision to reveal certain information at this point in the novel.
  • I like this part because” provides students with the practice of making a claim or statement and supporting it with evidence from the text.
  • I think the character is feeling _____ because” forces the students to make inferences based on a character’s actions or words, and they have to support that inference with evidence from the text.
  • I think _____ will happen next” gives students a chance to make predictions as to what they think will happen based upon what they have read thus far. Making predictions is one of the top indicators of an informed and engaged reader.
  • In all honesty, we haven’t gotten to the last square yet, and I don’t have a “retelling bookmark“, so this might remain untouched by my classes.  I can live with that.

The day after our read aloud, I put all of my students in all of my classes in pairs, and I gave each pair a laminated copy of the “Ways we can partner talk” card.  One student would read a page from our novel, and when he or she finished, each kid said something about what they just read using one of the prompts on the card, then the other student read and the process repeated itself again and again.  Just thinking back on these classes has me giddy! I couldn’t believe all of the incredibly rich and wonderful discussions going on around the classroom between all of the different pairs of students.  My euphoria during the moment when the reading and discussing was going on was quickly met with regret that I hadn’t discovered this tool earlier in the year.  There’s always next year, though, and I will definitely be implementing this card into my classes sometime around the first week of school.

 

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