Taking an optimistic mindset into Professional Learning days

I won’t see my students tomorrow because our district has a designated Professional Learning (PL) day.  I can already hear the collective groans from teachers everywhere.  A good number of teachers view PL as a waste of time; something that is taking away from the smorgasbord of tasks that teachers already have piled high on their plates.  However, in my current district, the PL has been phenomenal, and I have gotten a number of wonderful strategies and ideas that have really shifted how I teach Language Arts to my 7th graders, several of which are listed below.

Three years ago, a University of Georgia professor gave me a copy of Reading in the Wild by Donalyn Miller at a PL session.  That booked totally transformed how I teach reading to my students.  Before reading Miller’s text, my classes read four novels a year as a class (or one per unit), with everyone reading the same book.  Today, my kids are all reading different books of their own choice for the first 10 minutes of every class period.  Needless to say, my students are reading WAY more than before and they are learning to explore various genres of books on their own.  In addition, the majority of my students are forming a relationship with literacy that previously was not present.  We only have our students for a year, so it’s our job as teachers to help them make reading a lifelong habit, and that can only be done if students learn how to take ownership of their reading lives.

Another instructional strategy that I took away from a PL that I have found to be highly effective in helping students master the concept of argumentative writing is the CSET strategy.  This technique shows the students how to craft an argumentative paragraph that contains a claim (C), a set-up that shows where this information is coming from (S), a piece of evidence from the text (E) and a tie-in (T) sentence that shows how their evidence supports their claim.  The CSET strategy can initially be taught to the students using cartoons, Pixar Shorts or New York Times Op-Docs to help them understand the basic structure.  Then, I can begin giving them CSET assignments that require them to support a claim based upon either our class novel or an informational text.  Because this strategy only requires the students to produce an effective paragraph, it doesn’t seem as daunting to them at first. However, once they master how to create one strong paragraph, I can challenge them to create another one that argues the same viewpoint. Eventually, students can produce multiple CSETs, and they are able to craft a well-organized argumentative essay with several reasons that all support a claim with valid textual evidence.

A final strategy that I have been using a lot this year comes from the text Reading Nonfiction: Notice & Note Stances, Signposts, and Strategies (Beers, Probst), and guess what? I gleaned it from a PL day. When my students read informational texts, instead of just assigning a question set for them to answer when they finish, this year I have been applying a Notice & Note strategy and I have really seen a difference in how my students engage with nonfiction texts.  Before reading the text, we have a whole class discussion about how when we read or hear something that surprises or shocks us, it’s because we are usually learning something new. Then, while my students read a news article, they label three things that surprised or shocked them.  Once they finish, they confer with a partner or small group and review what surprised or shocked everyone.  The discussions that manifest from this one question are phenomenal to observe, and the students interaction with the text is at a much deeper level.  When we come together as a class to recap their observations, our whole group discussions are filled with rich and astute comments. At the end of class, students will typically write a short response that highlights one thing from the text that truly shocked them and why.  This strategy has definitely enhanced my students’ ability to identify central ideas in informational texts as well as their ability to pull out key details from the text.

A final blessing that I have gotten from PLs in my district is a host of educational apps that I have used regularly in my ELA classes.  Our school is 1:1 with computers, so it is imperative that I attempt to engage my students with 21st century tasks.  I’ve had students create oral arguments using Flipgrid, Youtube, Voki and Screencastify.  I’ve reinforced grammar concepts using NoRedInk. I’ve introduced new material to students using Edpuzzle. All of our classwork is pushed out to students using Google Classroom.  My exit tickets are often are done electronically via Linoit.  All of these aforementioned apps were presented to me in different PL sessions.

It’s certainly possible that I have been lucky by being in a district that values PL and provides us with strategies and tools that we can immediately take to the classroom, and other teachers elsewhere have not been as fortunate.  However, I also think there is a likelihood that teachers may be guilty of approaching PL days with a less than optimistic outlook.  Or, it could be a combination of the two. Either way, my advice to teachers everywhere is to head into the PL days with the expectation that you are going to be given something that can be applied to your classes.  I know that’s going to be my mindset tomorrow morning.

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Use Edpuzzle to enhance student engagement

I use Youtube a lot in my classroom, especially when I’m introducing new concepts.  It’s a great way to differentiate how I present content to students.  I’m a realist. I understand that a Youtube video at times is more interesting to my students than the sound of my voice.  Especially when we are examining some of the less exciting 7th grade state standards: sentence types, coordinate adjectives and misplaced and dangling modifiers.  A lecture on any of those aforementioned topics is not going garner the attention of my students for an incredibly long period of time.

Shmoop makes A LOT of highly-engaging educational videos.  Shmoop’s content is witty, fast-paced and full of attractive graphics.  I’ve used a number of Shmoop videos over the years to pique my students interest into a mini lesson focused on grammar, which is probably your average 7th grader’s least favorite segment of English Language Arts.

However, I’ve noticed this year that while my students appear to be watching the videos that I show them in class, I’m not sure that they are learning from them. Our students today go to the internet for the majority of their entertainment needs. They use Youtube to watch television shows, movies, sports highlights and recorded video game sessions.  While learning from a Youtube video may seem like a novel idea to a Generation Xer like myself, I’m starting to wonder if these videos are starting become white noise to some of my students.  If that is the case, that’s a problem.

Fortunately, there is a solution. Enter Edpuzzle, a free educational technology company that allows teachers to customize videos and tailor them towards their students.  I feel it’s important at this point to mention that I currently work in a district that is one-to-one with technology, meaning that every student that I teach is issued a laptop computer from the district that they can use for the school year.  If I worked in a district where computers were harder to come by, then Edpuzzle may not be practical.  However, if it’s not difficult for you to get computers into the hands of your students, then you must give this website a try the next time you want to show a video that introduces content in your class.

Edpuzzle allows teachers to create assignments for their students using videos from sites like Youtube.  Once a teacher decides upon a video that they want to use in class, they can upload it to Edpuzzle, and then embed multiple choice questions, short response questions or a combination of both inside the video.  These questions make the instructional videos highly interactive for students.  My kids have to pay attention to the content because they are being asked questions as they watch, and they know that I will be grading their responses (actually, Edpuzzle grades them for you if they are multiple choice).

Not only does using Edpuzzle put more of the responsibility of learning on the students, but it also serves to enhance retention.  Rather than just consuming a video, students using Edpuzzle must process the information.  If I watch a 4 to 5 minute video covering a new concept, I’m most likely not going to remember much more than a few details.  However, if I’m forced to respond to questions throughout, some of which require me to type out my thoughts, I’m definitely going to recall more of what was shown to me.  Anecdotally speaking, I’ve seen a uptick in classroom participation after my students have viewed an Edpuzzle video.  Last week, I had kids in each of my classes that never raise their hands telling their classmates the differences between independent and dependent clauses.  Had I simply just shown that same video to my students on the overhead, I’m positive that those students would not have participated in those discussions.

This week I’m using some of my mini lessons to cover coordinate adjectives. I know, I know, thrilling stuff. However, we are just two weeks away from the end of the year assessments, and I like to save the last few weeks before them to cover some of the more mundane standards, so that I can use the rest of the school year to read books, talk about books and write about books.

Anyhow, here’s the video I’ll be using.  Feel free to check it out. I did not create the video; I simply pulled it into Edpuzzle and put some questions into it.  I’m hopeful that it will serve as a helpful introduction into this topic for my students on Monday.

 

Trying something new in the classroom

My students and I have been co-constructing a lot of our writing lately.  Essentially, I act as a facilitator, and the students brainstorm out loud and tell me what to type on the whiteboard.  So far, we’ve co-constructed multiple reading response paragraphs, an essay arguing for later school start times, and as of this week, a narrative. Up to this point, we’ve been embarking upon our co-construction as a whole group.  For the most part, it’s been a success.  Sure, only about half the kids in each class offer up ideas and sentences for me to type, but I know that the others are benefiting from hearing their peers and seeing how their thoughts transform into written words.

This week, however, I wanted to put more of the onus of the co-construction on my students.  On Thursday, we read “The Tell-Tale Heart” by Edgar Allen Poe. For anyone who’s never read it, here’s the basic plot: a man kills the old man he is taking care of, hides the body in the floorboards and eventually confesses to the police when he becomes so overridden with a combination of paranoia and guilt that he “hears” the dead man’s heart in his head.

The prompt I gave my kids: Rewrite the ending of the story from the point of view of one of the police officers. 

As a class, we broke this section of the story down into three main events:

  1. The police arrive at the house of the victim.
  2. The suspect shows them around the house.
  3. The suspect confesses to the police.

Then I split the students up into groups, and each group was assigned a portion of the story to write. This was my first time letting go of the reigns in regards to the co-construction process. Was I nervous? Sure.  My biggest fear was that students wouldn’t agree on how to move the narrative along since this task did require a certain level of creativity on their part.  I thought that some groups would struggle to produce.

I was completely wrong. Not only were the kids highly-engaged in the assignment, but they did an amazing idea of working together and sharing ideas. The narratives that they produced contained descriptive language, sensory details and small amounts of dialogue. At the end of the class, a member from each group came to the front of the room to read their portion, and sequentially we heard the entire story that my students had created.  This could not have gone better.

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Co-construction in regards to writing is something that I have just started doing with my students this year.  To be clear, co-constructive writing is not something that I came up with on my own; I learned of it during a professional learning day at my school.  The key, however, is that this tool did not stay in our training room.  I took the concept and tried it in the classroom, despite my fears of whether it would work or not with my students.

As teachers, we must be willing to try new things in our classrooms even if it takes us out of our comfort zones.  Our students are dynamic, and we must be, too.  We regularly ask our students to try new things: genres of books, writing styles and educational apps. We put them in groups with people they may not know that well and expect them to discuss concepts from our class. When our cafeteria serves hummus, I encourage my students to try it.  If I’m going to ask them to try all these new things, then I have to be willing to take risks as well when it comes to planning lessons and activities for our classroom.

Will trying new things always work out well?  Of course not.  Sometimes, lessons are going to flop. The first time I had my students read in pairs 6 years ago, it was a disaster. I didn’t group them strategically.  I didn’t model what I expected paired reading to look like, so my students had no idea for how long they were supposed to read before they switched; they also didn’t know what their role was while their partner was reading.

When my students read in pairs now, it runs smoothly and the kids have engaging discussions with their partners while they read. This transformation did not occur magically.  I reflected on why my initial attempts at pair reading failed, and I researched ways to improve. But none of these changes would have ever occurred if I hadn’t taken a gamble and attempted to do something in my class in a new way.

Teachers owe it to their students to continuously find ways to keep the content fresh, and we must be willing to take risks in our classrooms from time to time for the kids’ benefit.

 

 

Helping students master argumentative writing

On Friday I was in a professional development session, and the speaker asked us to go around the room and introduce ourselves by saying our name, what book we are currently reading and a recent success from the classroom.  I shared that this quarter my students are working on argumentative writing, and I have been pleased with the progress that they are making in being able to explain their reasoning when using text evidence and details their responses.

By the time the students get to me in 7th grade, they are decent enough at finding relevant text evidence when I present them with a text-dependent question.  Where they struggle is being able to explain to the reader how their evidence relates to their ideas.  At the beginning of the year, most of the responses that I get from students on questions that require text evidence usually JUST include the quote from the book or article that we are reading; for the most part, they do not make an attempt to connect that evidence to their topic sentence or claim.

However, my students are now working through that step, and they are showing me in their writing that they understand why they are using the evidence or details that they have selected, and how that evidence supports their ideas and thought process.

I use an argumentative writing model called CSET that I learned in a professional development training at the beginning of the previous school year.  The (C) stands for the claim that that student is trying to make.  The set-up (S) shows the reader where the information is coming from, whether it’s a book, article, movie, etc.  Examples of set ups that I provide my students are:

  • “Article Title” says that…
  • <Author> said that…
  • <Author> reveals that…

The evidence (E) is just that, evidence that the student is using to support his or her claim in the topic sentence.  The last part, the tie-in (T), is the hardest piece for students to master.  This is the part of the paragraph where students have to show me that they understand how their evidence connects and supports their reason(s).  I usually give the kids the following sentence frames to use in their tie-in sentences:

  • Generally, when people…
  • Usually, when people…
  • If people…

I instruct them to use this sentence to show how their evidence supports their claim, and how this is true not just in this one instance, but across a broader societal spectrum.

The first time I teach the kids CSET, I use the following cartoon:

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My students and I will co-construct a CSET that answers the following question: How does Slylock know that Shady Shrew is lying? 

I have done this activity with students several times now, so I cannot remember the exact CSET that my students and I put together this year, but it generally looks something like this:

(C) Shady Shrew is definitely lying.  (S) In the cartoon, (E) there is water on the table from a glass that got knocked over. (T) If someone had been gone for three weeks, then that water would have already evaporated; he couldn’t have been away on vacation that long because the water is still there.

Once the kids have the model above to reference, I have them create another CSET using a really short passage.  My students were not amazing CSET writers right off the bat.  They struggled with the tie-in piece because it forces them to think critically about why they are using the evidence that they are using.  But through repetition and practice, they are getting better and so is their writing.

As my students master this concept, I can push them to include multiple pieces of evidence in a paragraph.  Or, if I want them to produce a longer piece of writing – I just tell them to come up with several reasons and write multiple CSETs.

Argumentative writing can be tricky for our students, especially that critical portion where they have to connect the evidence they are using to their claims.  The CSET format gives students a model that helps them convey their thought process and reasoning in an academic fashion.

This week in my classes: journal writing, role-playing and finishing books

Journal writing

Since returning to school in the new year, my classes have been doing more journal writing than we were doing during the first half of the year.  Both the books that my students are reading – The Skin I’m In by Sharon Flake and After Ever After by Jordan Sonnenblick – pair up well with engaging writing prompts for 13-year-olds.  I’ve been reading through all of my kids’ journals the past few weekends, and though this task is time-consuming, I’m finding that I thoroughly enjoy reading their entries for the window it provides me with into their lives.  Their journal entries offer me conversation starters that I can use with students in the halls between classes, and they are helping me deepen my relationships with them.

Last week, the kids responded to the following prompt:

“Think about a difficult conversation that you’ve had in the past.  What was it about and how did you feel afterwards?”

I was shocked to learn how many of my students have lost parents and other loved ones. Some have seen parents and relatives go to jail. Others have been or still are facing bullying on a regular basis.

Several of the students that wrote that they had experienced some of those issues above can be a challenge in the classroom in regards to behavior, but at least now I might have an idea as to why that’s the case.  I have somewhere that I can start from in regards to helping those kids figure out how they fit into our classroom dynamic.

Hot spot activity

I stole another activity off Twitter that I tried this week that’s called “hot spot“. Here is how it worked: after reading aloud to the class from a novel for roughly 10 minutes, I stopped and chose a student to “become” one of the characters from our book.  That student had to get into the mindset of that character and view the world as only he or she would.  Then, other students could raise their hands to ask that person questions from what we have read so far. What an amazing way to examine character motivation!  The questions that the kids asked were brilliant, and nearly all of them pertained to some specific event from the text. It was a completely student-led discussion over our class novel; I just sat back and observed as my students peppered the student doing the role-playing with questions.  I would highly recommend this activity to anyone looking to spice up classroom book discussions.

Friday is for finishing books

Several more students finished books on Friday that they had been reading in my class for the past several weeks now.  Another girl completed Long Way Down by Jason Reynolds on Friday, and like every student that I teach that has read that book, she was upset by the lack of closure at the end and definitely thinks that Reynolds has to write a sequel.

A boy in one of my advanced classes just wrapped up The Crossover by Kwame Alexander.  This is the second book he’s read to completion on his own in my class this year (his first book was Bull by David Elliott).  This year is the first year that I’ve had an advanced Language Arts class, and I’ve definitely noticed that those students appreciate the time in class for independent reading as much as my other Language Arts classes. Unfortunately, I fear that some teachers assume that just because students are advanced that they are automatically devouring books at home in their free time, but that is not the case.  These kids enjoy video games and social media just as much as the next 13-year-old. They too need some structured time set aside in school each day where they can read for pleasure without any of the distractions that modern technology offers teens today.

Jason Reynolds interview with Trevor Noah on “The Daily Show”

This clip should be required viewing for middle and high school English Language Arts students and teachers everywhere.

The first 10 minutes of class

I realize how cliché this statement sounds, but I’m trying to write more this year about my classroom experiences.  I know that writing more will improve my writing, which is an obvious plus.  And I’m an English Language Arts teacher, so I should be practicing what I preach and writing on a semi-regular basis.  But more importantly, I don’t want to forget all the wonderful things that go on inside my classroom daily, and this seems like a decent way of preventing that from happening.  So without further adieu, here are my highlights thus far from 2018:

The first 10 minutes

I’m a firm believer that students need time in class to read books of their own choosing.  I’ve been implementing this approach to literacy for over 3 years now, basically from the moment I finished reading The Book Whisperer by Donalyn Miller.  For the past two years (and half of this year), I’ve always blocked out several work sessions a week to allow the students 15 to 20 minutes of unobstructed time to read a self-selected book.  The problem that I’ve wrestled with for some time, though, is that there is never enough time to do all the things that I need to do with the kids.  They can’t just read their own books; we have to have mentor texts that we can use together so that the students can work in small groups to practice all the skills that go along with being a good reader (making inferences, learning new vocabulary, recognizing and understanding point of view, explaining how setting affects both the characters and the plot, conflict, etc., etc., etc.).  If I give them two to three days a week to read their own books, then that only leaves a couple of days to work on all those aforementioned skills. Oh, and I have to teach them how to write the following genres: narrative, explanatory and argumentative.  There just isn’t enough time. I always feel like I’m taking away from something else, and that makes me feel guilty as hell as their teacher.

This week, though, I stumbled upon a podcast called Teach Me, Teacher that offered me a solution to my aforementioned problem: read at the beginning of class.  In the first episode that I listened to, the host, Jacob Chastain, interviewed THE Donalyn Miller, and he divulged to her that he has his kids reading from their self-selected texts for the first 15 minutes of every class.  Chastain claimed that using this opening portion of the class actually helped him to reduce wasted time in his lessons because his students were on task as soon as they walked into the room. His class periods are slightly longer than mine, so I couldn’t reconcile using 15 minutes, but this week I started off all my classes with 10 minutes of independent reading time followed by a “Status of the Class” update and a short reading response in their journals.  Then we moved into whatever skill I wanted to cover that day using either a newspaper article or our class novel.

I’ve only been implementing this strategy for a week, but so far I am loving it.  The kids know that as soon as they come into the room they are to find the book that they are reading and get to their seat so that when I walk in they are ready to begin.  Historically, I had what we call a “Brain Crank” or “Warm Up” question on the board that the kids are supposed to answer when they come into my room.  Typically, this could be a quote from a book we are reading or something else that requires them to make an inference.  The problem, however, is that I teach 7th graders, and they get very little time to socialize throughout the day other than the two minutes when they are in the hall transitioning to their next class.  So when my students enter my room, they are not all going to be 100% committed to sitting down and starting my warm up question.  Inevitably, several students will not have even remembered to grab their composition notebooks on the way into class. Several more might have managed to get their notebooks, but by the time I enter the room they are still resting closed on their desks.  And generally anywhere from 3 to 10 kids are in need of a pencil, hence, the name of this blog.  By the time all of those issues get resolved, we’re a couple minutes into the lesson and my students are just now attempting to tackle the question.  Four to five minutes later, we go over their responses. All and all, this task can take anywhere from 6 to 9 minutes.

However, the process of getting a book and starting to read limits most of those roadblocks I mentioned above.  Plus, while the kids are reading, I can knock out all the little house-cleaning tasks that teachers have to go through before class can really begin: take attendance, hand out pencils, pass out handouts or articles, etc.  This also gives me a chance to jot down what titles everyone is reading and notice who’s sticking with a book and who’s giving up on what they read the day before (which means I know who I need to talk to ASAP).  I can already tell I am not wasting as much time as I was before when I had the warm up question routine.  My lessons are tighter and the kids are reading more on a daily basis.  Also, they are reading from multiple texts in one lesson period, which helps them to recognize the similarities and differences in content and style that exist across books.  One other perk of this new strategy is that having the students begin a class by reading independently is a great way to chill everybody out, and it sets everything up for a productive lesson.

Mini book club

I have about eight students now spread out amongst my five classes that have read Long Way Down by Jason Reynolds on their own.  Each of them was frustrated with the ending.  They didn’t understand why the author didn’t provide them with a clear-cut solution that neatly wrapped the story up at the end.  As I alluded to above, middle school students do not have a lot of unstructured time, and nor do the teachers for that matter.  If I were a high school teacher, I wouldn’t have to eat lunch with my students, and I could host small groups to discuss the books that we were reading or that we had recently finished.  Alas, this is not the case for me, but I wanted to get these students together so that they could vent about the book in the same place.  So I snagged them one by one on Friday and brought them into my homeroom and let them go at it, which was awesome!  They all expressed their frustrations with the book’s conclusion, and then looked to me to provide them with some sort of comfort or solution to this transgression by Mr. Reynolds, to which I just shrugged my shoulders (which led to more arguing).  I want these little organic book discussions to happen more amongst my students who have read the same book, and I’m going to make a goal for 2018 to figure out how to make this happen on a more frequent basis.

Rock, Paper, Scissors tournament

Someone that I follow on Twitter last year posted that they hold “Rock, Paper, Scissors” tournaments in class to give their students a quick mental break, and I wish I could remember who that person was because I would gladly send them a gift card to their favorite restaurant.  This year, I’ve held regular tournaments in my class, and I have found them utterly delightful.  First off, they take no longer than 3 minutes to complete, assuming you don’t go best 2 out of 3 (even with twenty-something kids in the room).  Second, they get the kids out of their seats for a few minutes, which is always a bonus.  Lastly, they are a refreshing break from the content and they are absolutely hilarious.  I’ve yet to host a tournament that didn’t involve at least one kid that couldn’t seem to grasp that it’s “One, two, three – shoot!”, and after several failed attempts the entire class is usually in stitches.

I can’t wait to see what next week brings!

 

 

Using “Status of the Class” to learn more about our students’ reading habits

Reading Donalyn Miller’s Reading in the Wild two years ago was a game-changer for my Language Arts classroom. That book shifted the way my students engage with reading. Each week, my students receive allotted time in class to choose what they read; they explore new genres; they discover their favorite authors.  

In previous posts, I’ve already highlighted the numerous benefits that arise from giving students the space to read for pleasure in the classroom.  I’m not going to do that again here, but in short, kids need opportunities to get lost in books during class time.  For teachers, this means relinquishing some control and suppressing the urge to push state standards, but it’s integral to develop of a child’s literacy.

The reason I am writing today is to highlight a tool that I pulled from Miller’s book that I use every time my students read independently: “Status of the Class”, an activity that will hopefully one day eradicate the use of the dreaded reading logs. Nothing takes the fun out of reading more than having to fill out a mundane log in which you document the pages that were read and  then write a summary about it.  I don’t keep a reading log on my nightstand so that I can track my progress through a book, so I’m not going to make my students do it either.

Four simple words: Status. Of. The. Class.  I love this activity so much that I’m including a link to a free copy in this post.

Here is how it works:

I use a three-column table that contains the following information: student name, book title, page number, “I’m at the part where” and “A/N/S”.  For me, it’s way easier to type in the kids’ names for each class so that I don’t have to continue to handwrite them in each week; rather, I just print out copies and make sets for the days that my students will read independently.  

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I apologize for my slopping handwriting; sometimes it’s hard to write neat when quickly jotting down so many responses. Also, an “F” means that a student finished a book.

While students are reading for the pre-established amount of time, I circle the room and jot down the title of each child’s book.  As I enter in the titles, I go to the last column and put in either an A, N or S (A= abandoned, N = new, S = same).  If a student quits a book and starts another, I label that with an A.  If they are continuing with the same book from the last time we read I designate an S, and if they are starting a new book because they finished the one that they were reading previously I enter an N.  These three little letters offer an incredible amount of insight into my students’ reading habits.  As teachers, the progression that we most want to see is for students to go from an S to an N, as this means that they are reading books to completion.  However, the A’s really help me hone in on my struggling readers, and through short conversations I can learn why these students are leaving the books that they have started; furthermore, I can use their responses to help recommend different books and genres that might be more suited to these particular students.

Once the allotted time of independently reading comes to a close, the most fun part of this whole activity really begins, in my humble opinion.  Students take turns giving me two pieces of information: page number and “I’m at the part where…”.  I tell my kids that their “I’m at the part where…” should be a quick, short summary of what is going on in their books at this exact moment.  Hearing twenty-something students providing a small piece of their book’s plot is pure entertainment given the diversity of the responses. It’s also a quick and easy way to peak students’ interest into what their peers are currently reading.  After I’m finished with the whole class, I usually give the students a few minutes to discuss with a partner over something that they heard, and there’s rarely a dearth of conversation.  This whole process takes roughly 5 to 8 minutes.

While it seems obvious that getting the page numbers from the students is an easy way to track their progress, it also holds them accountable.  If a student reads just a page or two during a 15-minute independent reading segment, I can have a private conversation with them to figure out why they are not taking advantage of this time.

I hope that I have done a sufficient job of explaining and promoting “Status of the Class” as I think it is vital part of any independent reading program.  I have such a stronger understanding of my students’ reading tendencies through the use of this activity, and I will continue to employ it as my classes continue on their independent reading journeys this year.